Green and yellow total opposites?

     When you go to the market and pick your fruits and veggies, do you know if they are going to be sweet, tangy, sour or tart by just looking at them? I wish we could have that ability! At least with a Plantain you can.

Plantains in various stages of ripeness.

They are a close cousin of bananas.They are a fruit, but it’s considered a vegetable. Plantains are bigger and firmer than bananas, their peel is thicker and they are lower in sugar content. Plantains are a staple food in the tropical regions and can be eaten at different stages of ripeness.From green and firm to yellow with black spots and soft.When green. they are tough and starchy, similar to a potato or a yucca root.When yellow with black spots, they turn a little bit soft and midly sweet. When almost black, they are soft, sweet and with a unique flavor. The most important difference between a plantain and a yellow sweet banana is that you can’t eat plantains RAW. The plantain has to be cooked first!  
Plantains are available in most U.S supermarketsand are found in the produce section of your local supermarket. Look for firm plantains and avoid shriveled, squishy, or moldy fruit. You can ripen plantains by storing them at room temperature and out of direct sunlight, turning them every day. It will take at least 1 week for green plantains to fully ripen.
So what to do with them??
In Puerto Rico, alot of restaurants feature a classic dish called Mofongo. It’s a terrible name for something that is borderline heavenly. It’s the perfect mix of fried, crunchy, salty and over all AMAZING!
It was featured in an episode of “The Best thing I ever ate”. Guy Fieri was amazed on how these few ingredients could make such a flavorful dish!
Here are the ingredients to make mofongo:
2 or 3 large green plantains
Salt to taste
Black pepper
Canola oil for frying
Olive oil
Garlic

And now watch my video on how to make it 🙂

Buen Provecho!!

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