Coquito or PuertoRican Eggnog

ImageI love Christmas and everything that goes with it. The tree, decorations, and especially the food!! Let’s start with a holiday drink, coquito.

The  the name coquito came from “ron con coco” or rum with coconut, a drink made by  workers in the cane fields in Puerto Rico. Rum is obtained from cane sugar by fermentation, distillation, and aging. By adding sugar cane molasses  to the distilled rum and coconut milk, they obtained a sweet  concoction  that was called “ron con coco” or rum with coconut.

So how does ron con coco turn into coquito?? When North Americans arrived in Puerto Rico in the 1800’s, they shared  Eggnog, and it was blended and fused into our own drink called coquito. Some say coquito has to have eggs, some do not. It freaks me out to drink something that has been sitting in the fridge that has raw eggs? No thank you. There are many different versions of this drink, and this is my version.

Coquito

Ingredients:

1 can condensed milk

1 can evaporated milk

1 can cream of coconut

1 can coconut milk

1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

1/8 teaspoon ground cloves

1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

Pinch of salt.

Now here is a step by step tutorial on how to put it all together. It’s bilingual too, spanish and english

http://youtu.be/pYi5F4BRGTE

Green and yellow total opposites?

     When you go to the market and pick your fruits and veggies, do you know if they are going to be sweet, tangy, sour or tart by just looking at them? I wish we could have that ability! At least with a Plantain you can.

Plantains in various stages of ripeness.

They are a close cousin of bananas.They are a fruit, but it’s considered a vegetable. Plantains are bigger and firmer than bananas, their peel is thicker and they are lower in sugar content. Plantains are a staple food in the tropical regions and can be eaten at different stages of ripeness.From green and firm to yellow with black spots and soft.When green. they are tough and starchy, similar to a potato or a yucca root.When yellow with black spots, they turn a little bit soft and midly sweet. When almost black, they are soft, sweet and with a unique flavor. The most important difference between a plantain and a yellow sweet banana is that you can’t eat plantains RAW. The plantain has to be cooked first!  
Plantains are available in most U.S supermarketsand are found in the produce section of your local supermarket. Look for firm plantains and avoid shriveled, squishy, or moldy fruit. You can ripen plantains by storing them at room temperature and out of direct sunlight, turning them every day. It will take at least 1 week for green plantains to fully ripen.
So what to do with them??
In Puerto Rico, alot of restaurants feature a classic dish called Mofongo. It’s a terrible name for something that is borderline heavenly. It’s the perfect mix of fried, crunchy, salty and over all AMAZING!
It was featured in an episode of “The Best thing I ever ate”. Guy Fieri was amazed on how these few ingredients could make such a flavorful dish!
Here are the ingredients to make mofongo:
2 or 3 large green plantains
Salt to taste
Black pepper
Canola oil for frying
Olive oil
Garlic

And now watch my video on how to make it 🙂

Buen Provecho!!